3 Bible Heroes Exactly Like Me

Bible heroes

I lay in bed a few nights ago and couldn’t fall asleep. My wife was peacefully resting at my side, but my own brain would not shut off. I began to dwell on God’s word and God’s people (Psa 63:6). I began to ponder the lives of God’s “heroes,” people that we often look up to. Slowly it dawned upon me that there is so much I have in common with my “Bible Heroes.” I remembered having numerous conversation with people, where I would bring up an example of what my “Bible hero” did, and I was rudely interrupted “well you are not David!!” Yet, as I lay in bed, I was awash with the realization that I was just like them! I was, and am, like my Bible heroes.

1. I am like Peter

The “Rock” of Christ’s time (not Dwayne Johnson) is known as being very important, and one of the pillars of the church. Yet I am like him. When persecution came to Jesus, Peter ran away fearfully. When he was asked if he knew Jesus and was his friend, Peter thrice denied it, to preserve his life, to avoid conflict, and to prevent being ridiculed. For his own skin, he betrayed Christ. I am like him. In a desire to make people like me, I have often hidden that I was a Christian. I tried to fit in with people who thought Christianity was not cool, and I hid it from them. Later in his life Peter plays hypocrite and runs away from a group of gentiles, to please his Hebrew friends (Galatians 2:11-21). He leaves the group of “unrespectable” people to be accepted by the “honorable” group. I am like him. How often have I been a pretender and played two sides! I would hang out with my more religious friends and cower in silence while they judge those who were “unrespectable,” then I would join my friends on the other side and do the same. I did what was useful for my image. Lord forgive me.

2. I am like Jonah

The prophet Jonah is famous for the story of the whale. Most people think this important prophet, who has his own book of the Bible, came on a whale to deliver Gods message to a city. I have never ridden a whale, but I am like him. Jonah was afraid to do what God wanted. Perhaps he though he would be mocked, ridiculed, or worse, and so he ran from God and his life’s mission. I too ran from mine for so long. I remember early in my life, people would tell me I would become a preacher of the Gospel, and I cowered in fearful apprehension. Deep down I wanted nothing to do with any kind of gospels, religions, or preachers; I wanted to be a musician, who is loved and adored by many. Later in the story,  Jonah finally delivers God’s message to the city, condemning them and calling them to repent. Instead of hoping they would repent, he sits down and awaits God’s judgment. In his heart he has already judged them and counted them guilty. Oh how often I have done this! I considered others guilty and condemned, I wanted their judgment and punishment. I was jealous when one of my childhood friends repented and met Jesus because I had been “better” than him before, and now he was “better.” Deep down I though he deserved to be punished, not to be blessed with Grace and forgiveness. Lord forgive me.

3. I am like David

Everybody wants to be like David. Every person who has ever played a song to the Lord often associates themselves with David. I too, while playing guitar, imagined that I was as “great” as David. And now I have realized, I am indeed like David. The great shepherd king is known for many valiant deeds and heroism’s. And I am like him, but I’m not a hero. David set his eyes upon a woman, Bathsheba, who was not his. As she bathed in the nude, he drew his gaze upon her, and instead of running, he stayed and watched. She was not his, but he watched nonetheless. Oh Lord, how often had I joined the broken armies of Christian men who looked at pornography? For many years in my youth, I, like David, looked where I should not have. I didn’t look away, and it nearly ruined me. Only by God’s Grace did I survive and find healing. Later in his life, David is older and ought to be wiser, instead he commences a counting of all Israel (1st Chron 21:1-4) to see his power and control. He puffs up his chest desiring to know and count all his influence and wealth as his own, not the Lords. In my weakness, possessed by the ugliness of pride I too have considered everything my own. I have been jealous of others, and compared what I have to them, wishing to have more. I have counted my social influence, my wealth and possessions, even stupid things like Facebook “likes.” Oh Lord forgive me.

So yes, I am like my Christian heroes. I am exactly like the sum of all their worst moments. That’s is who I am in me. I am the worst of all the Bible stories. I am the murderer, the adulterer, the coward, the sinner, the runaway; that is who I am. Yet, in Christ, I can be… no, I am more. In Christ I am His. In Christ I am no longer me. In Christ I am appreciated, blessed, complete, justified, loved, forgiven, chosen, graced, called, welcomed, sanctified, and will be glorified. In me I am the worst of my Bible heroes put together. In Christ, I am the best of them. You can join me too. http://marshill.com/media/who-do-you-think-you-are

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